Breakout Sessions – Round 1
Thursday – 10:15 am

The New 3 R’s
University A/B

This presentation will focus on strategies to use with children with known and unknown trauma experiences.  The strategies will center around the new 3 R’s (Relationship; Responsibility; and Regulation) the focus for Kristin and Pete’s new book.  Participants will look together at how to address need versus behavior and design strength based intervention for students who are struggling.
Presenter:  Kristin Souers

Building Teachers’ Capacity For Success
Madison Ballroom

How do we increase student achievement? The research is clear that teacher effectiveness is the #1 determinant of student success. And every teacher, like every child, is unique and has strengths, weaknesses, goals, ambitions, gaps, and special qualities. Learn from award-winning principal and author Pete Hall how to support teachers’ growth as reflective practitioners through individualized motivation, personalized feedback, customized coaching, and differentiated supervision. Participants will discuss the application of a strengths-based approach (via the Continuum of Self-Reflection) and get practical tools for drawing the most out of every teacher…one teacher at a time. This session is related to Pete’s new book, co-authored by Alisa Simeral, Creating a culture of reflective practice: Capacity-building for schoolwide success (ASCD, 2018).
Presenter:  Pete Hall

Leveraging EE Flexibility to Deepen Leadership Impact
Senate B

Educator Effectiveness is designed to significantly grow teacher practice and student learning.  However, its implementation in many places often renders little growth for all the work.  This session will clarify local flexibility that evaluators have within this statewide system to garner much more impact.  We also will examine several examples of appropriate EE shifts that Wisconsin school/system leaders have taken in line with this flexibility, which may be a match for your school/system, too.
Presenter:  Joe Schroeder, Associate Executive Director, AWSA

Leading a Needs Assessment Process: Data Inquiry Process and a Tool for Continuous Improvement
Assembly

Effective teams utilize data inquiry that leads to data-informed actions. In this session, participants will learn 1) effective student data inquiry through an equity lens, 2) practices inquiry and 3) improvement planning and how to document their story. Explore the Data Inquiry Journal tool in WISEdash for Districts to document this process. Completion of all three parts of this tool will result in an improvement plan that meets the criteria of ESSA and IDEA. The process can also be used by teachers to develop an SLO/PPG. Ensure you have WISEdash access for full participation.
Presenters: Mary Ann Hudziak, CESA #6, and Lisa Arneson, CESA #3, WISExplore Team Members

The Nuts and Bolts of Working With Integrated Behavioral Health Providers
Caucus

Adams Friendship Area School District and Pine Valley Integrated Services will team up to share the details of how they brought two systems together to best meet the needs of students accessing on-site behavioral health services. We will share what we learned along our journey including what worked and what didn’t followed by a discussion of how to get this system working smoothly in your district.
Presenters: Crystal Holmes, Student Services Grant Coordinator; & Alyssa Maloney, Mental Health Coordinator, Adams-Friendship School District; & Amanda Falkers, MS, LPC, SAC-IT

Leading Through Self-Awareness
University CD

Leading for equity is heart work. A critical part of the role of leaders in maintaining equitable learning environments for all students begins by understanding who they are. This consciousness supports leaders to recognize their biases, understand how lived experiences shaped these biases, and identify how they impact interactions and decisions. With this level of self-awareness leaders can model vulnerability and support staff to increase self-awareness and examine personal biases. The self-aware leader creates conditions and uses processes that cultivate trust and foster internal accountability among staff. Effective leaders place priority on supporting staff to meet their needs as human beings and creates avenues for staff to contribute meaningfully to the change process. Leading for equity requires responding – not reacting – to bias-based language and behaviors in the moment that calls out bias while modeling a growth-oriented approach that engages rather than shuts down others. Leaders identify and remove systemic factors contributing to inequity. In this session, participants will 1) examine their own identity as a leader, 2) gain strategies to create conditions and use processes to support self-awareness among staff, 3) practice responding to bias in the moment, and 4) increase understanding of key points of intervention to address systemic inequity.
Presenters: Roderick “Rudy” Bankston, Restorative Justice Practitioner; & Mara McGlynn, Restorative Justice Practitioner and Social Worker

The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys
Senate A

This workshop will introduce The Guide for White Women who Teach Black Boys. The Guide was created to support white teachers in their search for opportunities of personal growth as educators and the academic achievement of their black male students. Using sections of the Guide and video throughout the workshop, engage in concentrated, focused inquiry about relationships with black male students and the impact of race and racism on those relationships. Raise specific questions among participants and share responses. Close by setting short-term and long-term goals in a personal and professional action plan.
Presenter: Eddie Moore Jr., The Privilege Institute

Cultural Humility: Moving Beyond Cultural Competence to Advance Equity & Social Justice
Parlor 629 (Sixth Floor)

Cultural competence has long been known as the cornerstone for diversity awareness and cross-cultural communication. But its flaws and limitations point to a paradigm shift toward cultural humility, a framework for advancing equity and social justice by intentionally living at the crossroads of who we are, how others see us, and where power positions us within a system. On a small scale, cultural humility can enhance communication, foster trust, deepen connections, and improve outcomes when interacting across difference. In the bigger picture, it’s a process that can radically transform organizations. In this experiential workshop, participants will engage in self-work, gain a deeper understanding of individual and group membership, and practice cultural humility along the way.
Presenter: Amanda Goodenough, Director of Campus Climate, Division of Diversity & Inclusion, UW-La Crosse


Breakout Sessions – Round 2
Thursday – 1:15 pm

Equity in Action: How To Navigate The Spaces When “They Don’t Get It”
University AB

This session is designed for educators ready to engage in strategies that focus on dismantling systemic oppression. Many of us attend conferences with racial battle fatigue as a result of taking on both institutional and individual micro & macro aggression, as well as for others who resist the necessary work for a more social just environment. Our motto: Don’t let your passion overcome your purpose. Participants will explore how to navigate their communities in a sustainable approach. While oppression manifests uniquely in each community, do not mistaken that oppression is interconnected globally. This means that our liberation is in the global connections we make. What if we then could co-create a language for our liberation? Equity in Action is a session designed to provide participants tools to be critically self reflective, assess for brilliance, and generate 100% engagement, as well as an accountability work plan to ensure implementation occurs – To walk our walk!  Let us not feel guilty for our privilege, rather use our privilege in having this awesome responsibility.
Presenters:  Dr. JuanCarlos Arauz, Executive Director & Aiyana Machado, Warrior Facilitator, E3: Education, Excellence & Equity

Conversations That Cultivate Reflection and Leverage Improvement
Madison Ballroom

This session will prompt participants to consider how they respond and approach difficult conversations about instructional practice, adult dispositions, and reluctance to feedback.  Whether you’re an administrator, a classroom teacher or instructional coach, this session allows you to consider and practice the approaches you take with people who may not be reflective, tend to dismiss feedback, think differently than you or are simply defensive.  Leave with some coaching stems that can be used immediately.
Presenter: Tammy Gibbons, Director of Professional Development & Information, AWSA

Data Accuracy, Accountability and Inquiry: What’s the Connection?
University CD

How accurate is your school’s data when used for accountability?  Accountability reports use the data each district submits in various snapshots taken throughout the year.  Do you have a system in place to validate the data submitted to the DPI? In this session, several tools and resources will be showcased to help district leaders be proactive about data accuracy, including the WISEdash snapshot tools. Learn how to use these tools to check for accuracy in state and federal reporting, clean up local data, as well as find opportunities for focus on equity and improvement.
Presenters: Jim Lee, CESA #12, and Judy Sargent, CESA #7, WISExplore Team Members

College and Career Ready IEPs: Improving Outcomes for Students Aged 3 through 21
Caucus

Students at every age must have a well-developed IEP to ensure they are able to access, engage, and make progress in grade level curriculum, instruction, and environments. DPI’s College and Career Ready IEP framework is built upon a student’s strengths and address needs that arise from the student’s disability, are aligned with grade-level content standards, and reflect a clear linkage between individual needs, ambitious and achievable goals, and IEP services. This presentation will provide an overview of DPI’s CCR IEP guidance, legal requirements to ensure a Free and Appropriate Public Education, examples from schools on how they have changed IEP conversations to focus on student needs and outcomes, and connecting special education compliance with results for students with disabilities.
Presenters: Scott Brown, Jessica Nichols & Andrea Bertone, DPI

Leading Through Self-Awareness
Senate B

Leading for equity is heart work. A critical part of the role of leaders in maintaining equitable learning environments for all students begins by understanding who they are. This consciousness supports leaders to recognize their biases, understand how lived experiences shaped these biases, and identify how they impact interactions and decisions. With this level of self-awareness leaders can model vulnerability and support staff to increase self-awareness and examine personal biases. The self-aware leader creates conditions and uses processes that cultivate trust and foster internal accountability among staff. Effective leaders place priority on supporting staff to meet their needs as human beings and creates avenues for staff to contribute meaningfully to the change process. Leading for equity requires responding – not reacting – to bias-based language and behaviors in the moment that calls out bias while modeling a growth-oriented approach that engages rather than shuts down others. Leaders identify and remove systemic factors contributing to inequity. In this session, participants will 1) examine their own identity as a leader, 2) gain strategies to create conditions and use processes to support self-awareness among staff, 3) practice responding to bias in the moment, and 4) increase understanding of key points of intervention to address systemic inequity.
Presenters: Roderick “Rudy” Bankston, Restorative Justice Practitioner; & Mara McGlynn, Restorative Justice Practitioner and Social Worker

American Indian Education in Wisconsin
Senate A

The presentation will provide participants with the learning opportunities to build their knowledge and skills of American Indian studies and education that will assist them in in working with Native students, families, communities, and nations in Wisconsin. Having an understanding of the educational experiences and perspectives of American Indian students their families and communities has profound implications for classroom, schools, and district policies and instructional methodology when transforming systems to educate all Native students in urban, rural, and suburban settings. In addition, the presentation will explore implementing best practices and education strategies for educators in working to support Native students. The presentation is also designed to deepen participants’ understanding around the American Indian student’s achievement in Wisconsin and ways for improving student outcomes academically while using data analysis and decision making to improve results and outcomes for students. Participants will further explore effective teaching and learning strategies that have a positive learning impact in their work with American Indian students. They will also have an opportunity to examine how history, culture, and language can impact student achievement, school climate, and student, family and community engagement. Additionally, participants will learn to recognize the inequities that play out in schools and collaborate to find effective ways to create more equitable institutions that serve all students in all education settings. As a result of attending this presentation, participants will: 1) gain an understanding of the unique circumstances facing Native people and communities in society; 2) examine how societal patterns and experiences for American Indian students plays out in their education; and 3) receive useful classroom strategies for culturally responsive practices that can be implemented into practice.
Presenters: David O’Connor, American Indian Studies Consultant, Content and Learning Team, DPI; and Rachel Byington, Doctoral Candidate, Civil Society and Community Research, School of Human Ecology, UW-Madison

Shifting the Paradigm: Learner-Centered Approaches to Inclusive Environments
Assembly

In this session, participants will be introduced to the Inclusive Learning Communities Practice Profile (ILC-PP). The ILC-PP serves as a starting point for practitioners to examine their practice from a learner-centered perspective as a way to implement change at a classroom and school level. The ILC-PP describes the essential attributes of a learning environment which is inclusive of each and every learner.
Presenters: Debra Ahrens, Inclusive Practices Consultant/Special Education Team, DPI; & Katharine Kramer, Ed.D, Carroll University

The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys
Parlor 629 (Sixth Floor)

This workshop will introduce The Guide for White Women who Teach Black Boys. The Guide was created to support white teachers in their search for opportunities of personal growth as educators and the academic achievement of their black male students. Using sections of the Guide and video throughout the workshop, engage in concentrated, focused inquiry about relationships with black male students and the impact of race and racism on those relationships. Raise specific questions among participants and share responses. Close by setting short-term and long-term goals in a personal and professional action plan.
Presenter: Eddie Moore Jr., The Privilege Institute


Breakout Sessions – Round 3
Friday – 9:45 am

Transforming School Culture
Madison Ballroom

This presentation will address the issue of conflicting agendas within schools.  A high performing school has a very clear purpose; high levels of learning for all students.  We will examine the barriers to aligning individual agendas with the organization’s agenda, and what ALL parties must do to develop the synergy necessary to guarantee learning.  We will examine the theoretical framework developed by Anthony Muhammad in the book Transforming School Culture: How to Overcome Staff Division, 2nd Edition (2018) as the basis for developing a collaborative culture.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Learn how staff division develops and how we can prevent it
  • Learn strategies that heal old social and professional wounds
  • Learn how to create an environment where every professional can thrive
    Presenter:  Anthony Muhammad

Materials Matter: The Connection Between Curriculum, Instructional Materials, And Equity For All Students
University CD

In this session, you will learn the connection between curriculum, instructional materials, and equity for all students. You will hear members of the New Glarus School District share how their data led them to adopt new instructional materials in literacy and math, the process they used to select and adopt materials, how they are implementing materials that provide access and equity for all students, and how teachers have been involved every step of the way to ensure a guaranteed and viable curriculum. You will walk away with resources and tools you can use to review instructional materials both for alignment to standards and for equity, a process you could use or modify to select instructional materials, and resources and tools that support a 3-5 year implementation plan.
Presenters: Laura Adams, DPI Literacy Consultant; Jennifer Thayer, Superintendent, & Teaching and Coaching Staff, New Glarus Public Schools

Every Teacher a Leader Summit 
Senate A

The Wisconsin Every Teacher a Leader Summit is a place for educators to bring a problem of practice, develop an actionable plan to address that problem, and meet others who can help along the way. Each team will work with a matched Critical Friend who will help create a plan to move forward toward resolution of the problem. The Summit isn’t your typical education conference – educators will be guided through a change protocol and given time to work on and walk away with an actionable plan that leads to real results in schools! Come and hear how this Summit has helped develop systems and structures that support teacher leadership in WI school districts. 
Presenter: Amy Traynor, Teacher Leader, Every Teacher a Leader Project

Are Student Grades Valid and Reliable Data? An Examination of College & Career Readiness
Caucus

Do your student grades align with college/career readiness data? While discussions about grading practices are often lively, there is no denying that student grades do not always align with assessment measures. Have you heard confused parents questioning why their child received a 15 on ACT, while receiving A’s in all courses, or a valedictorian having to take remedial courses despite a high GPA? Or even a student earning a 28 on ACT while getting Ds/Fs? How can data inquiry reveal potential misalignment and inequities?  Using WISEdash, participants will use cohorting to examine CCREWS, ACT, Aspire, and roster data.
Presenters: Jim Lee, CESA #12, and Lisa Arneson, CESA #3, WISExplore Team Members

Improving Life and Educational Outcomes for Wisconsin’s Young Men of Color
Parlor 629 (Sixth Floor)

Derute Consulting Cooperative with Milwaukee Public Schools’ Black & Latino Male Achievement (BLMA) Department will present a session on the vision, mission, priorities and strategies of BLMA in Milwaukee, WI. Session will include an overview of supports Derute provides Milwaukee area schools, schools districts and DPI to help improve equity outcomes and will emphasize how education leaders can connect to national efforts and resources and work with community and government partners to establish school, district and state-level supports for young males of color.
Presenters: Jeff Roman, Member, Derute Consulting Cooperative; LaNelle Ramey, Director, Department of Black & Latino Male Achievement; & Paul Moga, Program Coordinator, Department of Black & Latino Male Achievement, Milwaukee Public Schools

Become WISEdash Savvy
Senate B

The DPI provides Wisconsin public schools a free data tool:  WISEdash for Districts. How are you using this tool? WISEdash for Districts presents achievement, engagement and early warning data in easy-to-navigate layered dashboards with continuous updates and enhancements. This guided hands-on session is designed for novice users or those who have only scratched the surface. Use WISEdash to filter, export, and drill-down into student data for maximum effectiveness to examine achievement gaps and other equity concerns. Ensure you have access to WISEdash for Districts (laptop computers are recommended).
Presenters:  Mary Ann Hudziak, CESA #6, and Judy Sargent, CESA #7, WISExplore Team Members

Cultural Resilience: Catapulting The Brilliance In Every Student
University AB

As our indigenous ancestors shared: we teach what we have to learn. This session is a collaborative process of naming & sharing our collective history in order to engage with students. “Cultural Resiliency” is what we call the competencies (inner strengths) acquired through diverse life experiences that often come from one’s environment. Discover how these competencies – critical analysis, adaptability, cross-cultural communication, and innovation – reflect and honor the wisdom of our student’s lived experiences and create new, innovative standards and frameworks for educational equity and excellence. We invite you to discover how many of our most disfavored students have developed these skills through their lived experiences. We propose that these lived experiences develop competencies that can be code-switched into skills that are essential to be successful in academia and the workplace.

This session should particularly benefit those who work directly with students or whose responsibility is to evaluate others. By reflecting back to students how they have developed skills that are transferable to school, we honor the wisdom of our student’s lived experiences. Therefore, creating new, innovative standards and frameworks for educational equity and excellence.
Presenters:  Dr. JuanCarlos Arauz, Executive Director, E3: Education, Excellence & Equity; & Aiyana Machado, E3 Warrior Facilitator

We ARE or We DO? Monitoring Impact of Professional Learning Communities
Assembly

Cultivating teams who recognize their complementary skills and experiences will always exceed the goals of individual efforts.  Teams are more effective in problem solving and drive internal accountability but schools need to believe they ARE a PLC, not we DO PLC’s as if it’s a task to complete.  Leading a school to embrace and operate as a professional learning community is an important element of leadership.  This session will share some practical strategies for moving the needle using collaborative teams.
Presenter: Tammy Gibbons, Director of Professional Development & Information, AWSA


Breakout Sessions – Round 4
Friday – 11:00 am

Restorative Practices Implementation
Assembly

This session will include an overview of Restorative Practices in Milwaukee Public Schools, a school-wide implementation plan based on implementation science, and lessons learned through the Project AWARE grant when implementing Restorative Practices at the high school level. Time will be devoted for participants to reflect and assess their current level of implementation and steps needed to move forward.
Presenters: Moriah Weingrod, Restorative Practices Coach, Project AWARE; & Amanda Coyle, Project AWARE Coach; Milwaukee

Listening to OUR Stories: How Latinos Survive and Thrive in Rural and Urban Wisconsin
Parlor 629 (Sixth Floor)

This presentation highlights findings from “Latino Wisconsin: Needs Assessment and Family Integration,” a study of how Latino families are integrating into local communities across the state. We will discuss challenges faced by this population, the demographic shift Wisconsin is currently undergoing, and discuss how this shift is transforming local and state cultural, economic and political landscapes. A parallel and interwoven topic is researcher positionality, community based participatory research and its application, and how research can be used as a tool to help address equity challenges for public and private institutions. Ample time for dialogue and questions is built-in to this presentation.
Presenter: Armando Ibarra, Associate Professor/Director/Consultant, Disproportionately Technical Assistance Network, UW-Madison

The Data Disconnect Between Classroom Tasks and Standards
Madison Ballroom

How do you know if all students are engaged in expected grade-level work resulting in proficiency? Recent research reveals that “Students spent more than 500 hours per school year on assignments that weren’t appropriate for their grade and with instruction that didn’t ask enough of them …” (TNTP, 2018). This session examines various data practices and tools that will inform school leaders whether expectations, instruction, assignments, and learning align with grade-level standards. As a result of this session, participants will be ready to plan an alignment investigation in their school.
Presenters:  Jim Lee, CESA #12, and Lisa Arneson, CESA #3, WISExplore Team Members

Co-Teaching: Using Collaboration to Support Inclusive Environments
University CD

For twenty years research has clearly supported inclusive environments as a predictor of learner success, especially for students identified as eligible for extra support and specially designed instruction. Come learn how co-teaching is an effective delivery model within a system of equity and inclusion.
Presenter: Tracy Elger, Director of Integrated Programs and Services, CESA 2; & Ceil Carse, Faculty, Carroll College

Improving Life and Educational Outcomes for Wisconsin’s Young Men of Color
Senate B

Derute Consulting Cooperative with Milwaukee Public Schools’ Black & Latino Male Achievement (BLMA) Department will present a session on the vision, mission, priorities and strategies of BLMA in Milwaukee, WI. Session will include an overview of supports Derute provides Milwaukee area schools, schools districts and DPI to help improve equity outcomes and will emphasize how education leaders can connect to national efforts and resources and work with community and government partners to establish school, district and state-level supports for young males of color.
Presenters: Jeff Roman, Member, Derute Consulting Cooperative; LaNelle Ramey, Director, Department of Black & Latino Male Achievement; & Paul Moga, Program Coordinator, Department of Black & Latino Male Achievement, Milwaukee Public Schools

Strong Beginnings: Comprehensive Induction as an Evidence-Based Strategy to Address Equity
Senate A

This session is designed to support leaders as they plan and implement a comprehensive induction program. Teacher mobility and turnover compound the urgent need to provide a rich and stable school experience for the most underserved students. Consider how an induction program can attract, support and accelerate the development of, and retain new educators, as well as improve outcomes for ALL students.
Presenters: Heather Lott, Chair of Dane County New Teacher Project; Lynee Tourdot,  Education Consultant, CESA 2 ; & Kris Joannes, Sr. Outreach Specialist , WI Center for Education Research

Leveraging Learning-Centered Educator Evaluation
Caucus

Learning-Centered Educator Evaluation represents a promising way to leverage the Educator Effectiveness System to support improvement within and across schools and districts. Five principles characterize learning-centered evaluation:

1)         a context of trust encourages risk-taking and learning from mistakes;

2)         a common model of effective practice centers conversations about teaching and informs professional    learning within and outside the evaluation context;

3)         educator-developed goals frame the evaluation process and are regularly referenced;

4)         cycles of continuous improvement are guided by specific and timely feedback to drive practice; and

5)         evaluation practices are integrated with other school and district improvement strategies.

In this session, district leaders will join a UW-Madison researcher to share what they have learned through a 2-year study on Learning-Centered Evaluation and engage participants in collaborative workshop-style discussion on ways to maximize the EE system for growth purposes. Following an overview of the key findings, leaders from the study districts will be available at tables to share more about how their districts address one or more of the 5 principles and engage with session participants in problem solving around the topics.
Presenter: Steven Kimball, UW-Madison; Jennifer Butzler, Principal, Cashton School District; Patricia Deklotz, Ph.D., Superintendent, Kettle Moraine School District; Lori Mueller, Ph.D., District Administrator, Baraboo School District; Chris Nyman, Professional Learning Coordinator, Wausau School District; & Andrea Sheridan, Director of Teaching, Learning, and Leadership Integration, Wausau School District

Leadership Development: Evidence Based Approach
University AB

The presentation will outline a guide for selecting evidence based improvement strategies for principal and teacher growth. Specifically, participants will hear strategies and practices in coaching and growth development for all teachers to become effective teachers, particularly these working with historically marginalized students (e.g., students of color, students from low income homes, students with IEPs, and English language learners). This session will discuss evidence based models that have been proven effective in addressing equity and providing teachers the tools necessary to become effective teachers in an attempt to address the achievement gaps.
Presenters: Rachael Bergstrom, Assistant Director & Abdallah Bendada, Education Consultant, DPI